Homes 4 the Homeless

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Two years after the wildfires, the PG&E power outage reminds us that many are still experiencing homelessness. Many of our friends and neighbors, even the founder of Homes 4 the Homeless, Steve Schneider, two years after being left homeless, has been served with all the stark reminders of what it was like: no electricity, no lights, no water, no showers, no fuel. Something most of us take for granted, electric power, is a daily challenge to those experiencing homelessness.

Two years ago today, October 8, 2017, the Tubbs Fire swept down upon our community and, for many, brought devastation, suffering and homelessness. We’ve chosen this anniversary as the day to launch our first video on YouTube as a brief overview for our new nonprofit business.

(USA Today) Seniors are particularly vulnerable to financial and health disasters that can leave them homeless. USA Today on October 2, 2019 reported that senior homelessness …

Homes 4 the Homeless tiny homes and storage containers will be there for you when you need them. In times of great tragedy, whether it’s drugs, mental illness, or even a natural disaster, that’s when Homes 4 the Homeless’ tiny homes and storage containers come in.

During the fires many of the cars for our rental car agency in Fulton and at the Charles Schulz - Sonoma County Airport were burnt to a crisp. Throughout the area we had cars lost, as well as cars spread throughout the country. Luckily NextGear Capital stood by our side and weathered the storm with us so that we could maintain our business during this time of tragedy.

(Wall Street Journal) President Trump is bringing an unprecedented amount of attention to the homelessness in California when federal housing officials toured Los Angeles homeless …

A heartbreaking account from the September 9, 2019 Los Angeles Times by Lavonne Ellis, a retired news professional who chose to live in a van over the high price of living in California.

When the fires happened my wife and I lost everything, but thanks to companies like Farmers Insurance we have been able to put our lives back together …

When the fire chief decided to dock pay for excessive unexcused absences, why did the number of unpaid leaves for Christmas and New Year's rise? The New York Times argues that while we as humans generally act in our own self-interest, we have evolved to be really good at cooperation and empathy and are strongly motivated to teach and help others.

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